Tuesday, 10 November 2015

NHMRC Grant success for SPHPM

SPHPM received a total of $17.5 million in funding for 16 research projects including Early Career Research Fellowships in this week’s National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funding announcement.

Announced by the Minister for Health, the Hon. Sussan Ley MP, the $630 million funding will assist 836 projects over 2000 researchers.

Professor John McNeil, Head of SPHPM, said that the 2015 funding allocation was testament to the scope of expertise and research happening in the School.

“SPHPM continues to embark on dynamic research with important public health impacts – our researchers, no matter what stage in their research careers, continue to influence the domain of public health globally,” Professor Mc Neil said.

SPHPM had a success rate of 77 per cent for Early Career Researcher Fellowships – this well exceeds the national average of 21 per cent. Similarly, Monash University medical researchers fared well with $76.9 million allocated for competitive project grants, giving it a second place ranking overall.

“NHMRC funding is a vital funding source for the School, and one which adds vigour and prestige to our important projects.

“I congratulate all the successful applicants for the 2015 NHMRC round – your hard work is an asset to SPHPM, the field of scientific research and the wider global community,” Professor Mc Neil said.

Successful SPHPM NHMRC grant projects are detailed below:


Project Grants

Chief Investigator A
Project title and description
Funding received
Professor Jane Fisher
Learning clubs to improve women’s health and infant’s health and development in Vietnam: a
cluster randomized controlled trial of a low-cost, evidence-informed, structured intervention

The aim of this project is to investigate in a cluster-randomised controlled trial in rural Vietnam, the effectiveness of a novel approach: Learning Clubs for Women and Infants designed to address multiple risks at the same time. Outcomes are infants’ cognitive, motor, and social and emotional development, health and growth, and women’s mental and physical health.
$1,372,748
Professor Steve Webb
OPTIMISE CAP (Optimisation by Platform Trial Involving Multiple Interventions with Simultaneous Evaluation in Community Acquired Pneumonia)

A ground-breaking new Platform Trial that will use a highly adaptive and innovative
trial design to simultaneously evaluate the impact of a range of interventions to reduce mortality and morbidity for patients with Severe Community Acquired Pneumonia (Severe CAP) in ICUs across Australia. The trial will also provide a platform that can be adapted to test alternative interventions in the event of a pandemic that caused life-threatening Severe Acute Respiratory Illness (SARI), thus contributing a major component of Australia’s pandemic research
response.
$4,413,145
Professor Susan Davis
Sex Hormones and Heart Disease in Older Women Study (The SHOW Study)

Cardiovascular disease (CVD, ischaemic heart disease and stroke) is the leading cause of death in women aged 65 and over. Counter-intuitively, androgenic hormones, such as testosterone, may be as, or even more important, than estrogens in determining CVD risk and all-cause mortality in older women. This study is a key step in determining if androgen physiology and/or SHBG contribute to CVD in older women, and ultimately,
if there could be a therapeutic role for interventions to increase SHBG (dietary/pharmacological) or androgen treatment of older women to increase morbidity-free survival.   
$594,672
Professor Andrew Forbes
New methods and guidelines for the design, analysis and reporting of cluster-crossover and stepped wedge trials in public health and clinical research

The cluster randomised crossover and stepped wedge designs are being used with increased frequency in clinical and public health research settings. However, despite their use there has been very little methodological assessment of the statistical analysis methods used in current practice. This project will investigate how these trials can most efficiently be designed and analysed in order to provide robust research findings to guide health policy and practice.
$391,257
Professor Michael Abramson
Occupational and Environmental Exposures Associated with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis in Australia

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive scarring lung disease of unknown cause with little effective treatment from which most patients die within two to three years. Although relatively rare, the public health impact is similar to many cancers. This project will undertake a nationwide case-control study to identify jobs and exposures associated with the development of IPF. The results will influence policy to control exposures and over time reduce the occurrence of this devastating lung disease.
$282,760
Professor Stephen Bernard
Reduction of oxygen after cardiac arrest: The EXACT trial

This project will conduct a five-year Phase 3 multi-centre clinical trial to determine whether patient outcomes are improved with the delivery of
a reduced dose of oxygen post-cardiac arrest. Currently, patients who are successfully resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are administered 100% oxygen based on the idea that a higher
dose of oxygen would benefit organs and tissues that have been deprived of oxygen during the cardiac arrest. However, there is now compelling data indicating that excessive oxygen during the
early post-arrest period may lead to additional neurological injury and worse clinical outcomes .

$1,891,020

Development Grant

Professor Henry Krum
A non-invasive fluid status monitoring device for heart failure

Both acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are characterised by fluid overload. A device to detect this fluid overload in patients at an early stage has the potential to reduce the need for hospitalisation and initiate more timely and aggressive
intervention. A prototype device has already been developed and the study aim is to further improve on this device and advance to a commercial product.
$360,715

Program Grant

Professor Henry Krum
Novel approaches to the prevention and treatment of chronic heart disease and its co-morbid complications
$5,603,110

Early Career Fellowship Dementia Grant

Dr Julia Gilmartin
Optimising medication use to maintain or improve quality of life in aged care facility residents with and without dementia

This research aims to explore and understand how medications impact on the quality of life of aged care facility residents with and without dementia. The outcomes of this research will guide health professionals as they improve how medications are used in this population, with the aim of maintaining or improving quality of life. This research will also explore how these outcomes can be successfully included in regular practice and widely used nationally and internationally.
$600,627

Early Career Research Fellowships

Dr Christina Ekegren
Post-discharge care and recovery of seriously injured patients in a regionalised trauma system

'Regionalised’ trauma systems are now considered best-practice in trauma care. In a regionalised trauma system, resource use is optimised so
that seriously injured patients are transported to specialised trauma centres in a timely fashion. The establishment of regionalised trauma systems
has led to significant improvements in patient survival. However, despite these improvements, disability remains prevalent even 24 months following major trauma, contributing to significant ongoing health-care costs. It is widely acknowledged that there are still improvements to be made in reducing the non-fatal burden of major trauma.
$314,644
Dr Zoe McQuilten
Optimising transfusion support in critical illness and haematological malignancies

This project will investigate interventions to reduced bleeding and transfusion, and improved use of blood in clinical settings that are major users of blood, including critical care, trauma and haematological malignancies.
$262,250
Dr Julia Gilmartin
Optimising medication use to maintain or improve quality of life in aged care facility residents with and without dementia

This research aims to explore and understand how medications impact on the quality of life of aged care facility residents with and without dementia. The outcomes of this research will guide health professionals as they improve how medications are used in this population, with the aim of maintaining or improving quality of life. This research will also explore how these outcomes can be successfully included in regular practice and widely used nationally and internationally.
$314,644
Dr Ingrid Hopper
Polypharmacy in elderly Australians - can deprescribing improve health related outcomes and reduce costs?

The overall aim of the proposed research is to determine whether there are unnecessary medications which contribute to polypharmacy in the elderly community dwelling population of Australia, and whether withdrawal of some medication classes improves quality of life and other health related outcome measures, and to determine the economic impact of medication withdrawal.
$314,644
Dr Melanie Gibson
Improving pregnancy care for populations at risk in Australia

Pregnancy provides an opportunity to improve short and long-term health of both women and babies. Provision of high-quality, appropriate pregnancy care is a vital step in reducing health disparities in Australia. This public health research will focus on pregnancy care for three populations of women at risk of poor health before and during pregnancy: women of refugee background, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and women with polycystic ovary syndrome.
$314,644
Dr Thach Tran
Improving child health and development in resource-constrained settings: A multi-component study to inform policy and more effective interventions

This project includes secondary analyses of child health and development from multiple country longitudinal studies in low-income countries. The aims of this project are to examine the trajectories of child growth and development and determine the effects of factors at child, parental, family, community and country levels on the trajectories of child growth and development. As well as the impact of modifiable social determinants on these profoundly important public health problems.
$314,644
Dr Anju Johan
Longitudinal Studies in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a common disorder affecting women of childbearing age. It is associated with complications including infertility, diabetes, high blood pressure and mood disorders. This project will study different groups of women to compare the women with PCOS to those without, with the aim of understanding what the key contributing factors are to the development of these PCOS complications and in particular to study the effect of body weight.
$187,322

No comments:

Post a Comment

linkwithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...